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Month: June 2021

Johnnie Beattie returns for Glasgow v Munster

first_img Glasgow Warriors and Scotland no.8 Johnnie Beattie will make his return to frontline action tomorrow night when he takes the field against current Magners League leaders Munster at Musgrave Park in Cork (8 January, kick-off 7.30pm).Beattie has been out with a shoulder injury since he returned from Scotland’s historic Test series win in Argentina last summer and head coach Sean Lineen is delighted to have another of his key players back available for selection.“It’s great to have John back,” said Lineen. “He’s worked incredibly hard and it’s been frustrating for him more than me.“John is a model professional and I think he’s matured over the last few months. We’ve had him involved in a lot of meetings and analysis and he’s delivered really well there. But now he’s fit and ready to go.”Meanwhile, despite the exit of Beattie from the treatment room, four others make their way in following last weekend’s bruising derby against Edinburgh. All do so, however, on a short term basis.Beattie takes the place of Richie Vernon who picked up a dead leg in last weekend’s derby against Edinburgh whilst hooker Fergus Thomson is also sideline with a dead leg. Thomson is replaced by fellow internationalist Dougie Hall.The third change to the forwards simply sees props Ryan Grant and Jon Welsh swap places in the staring XV and on the bench.The only adjustment in the backs sees winger Alex Dunbar line up for his second start in place of Hefin O’Hare who has a calf injury.Dave McCall is another to make a welcome return to the starting XV and is named among the replacements. McCall returns in place of Federico Aramburu who continues to be treated for an ankle injury.Looking forward to Saturday’s match, Lineen continued: “There was relative disappointment following the second Edinburgh game having experienced euphoria after the first.“As for Munster, there’s such a confidence in them. The name Munster just seeps of rugby.“Munster have quality players right throughout their team and are on fire at the moment at the top of the league.“They have particular strength at nine and ten with players like Peter Stringer, Tomas O’Leary, Ronan O’Gara and Paul Warwick who direct the mighty Munster ship so well.“But we need to match their physicality and that starts up front with the forwards.”Glasgow Warriors team to play Munster in the Magners League at Musgrave Park on Saturday 8 January (kick-off 7.30pm)15 Bernardo Stortoni 14 Alex Dunbar13 Max Evans12 Peter Murchie11 DTH van der Merwe10 Ruaridh Jackson9 Colin Gregor1 Ryan Grant2 Dougie Hall3 Moray Low4 Richie Gray5 Alastair Kellock CAPTAIN6 Robert Harley7 John Barclay8 Johnnie Beattie LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS TAGS: Glasgow WarriorsMunster Substitutes: 16 Pat MacArthur, 17 Kevin Tkachuk, 18 Jon Welsh, 19 Aly Muldowney, 20 Ryan Wilson, 21 Henry Pyrgos, 22 Dave McCall, 23 Peter Hornelast_img read more

Who would be world champions at touch rugby?

first_imgFree running: Australia and Canada women have focussed on sevensWhich is where France would almost certainly fall down. France women based their Six Nations win on the power and bloody-mindedness of a pack. Would the guile of a Morgan Parra or the lethal step and sprint of a Wesley Fofana be enough to overcome a very contemporary French mentality of playing dour, crash-bang-wallop rugby? Test Touch  is a cut-throat environment, my friends! Predictable won’t cut it!Which is why England would have to come into the reckoning of this pub room proposal. The evasion and supply skills of Emily Scarratt and Katy Mclean could complement England men’s best passers – Stuart Lancaster is very fond of the way Billy Twelvetrees passes, for example – while a sevens specialist like Marcus Watson could complete a touch side nicely. Worth thinking about, anyway.But of course the Irish and Canadians would have to come into the thought process with their strong women’s games, Ireland men’s fine playmakers and both of Canada’s sevens teams being fairly feisty and ever-improving. The Welsh would have something to say about this, and then there’s South Africa and Fiji… Uh oh.. A touch of class: Every team, including the All Blacks, will play some form of touch. But who would rule? LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS So you’d better answer the question. Who would be the world’s best Test Touch side if current pros and internationals at 15s and sevens came in?*International touch is an event. However, there would theoretically be more appeal if global superstars from other walks of rugby took part. This blog merely ponders what would happen if they did and played in a revamped, freshly marketed event. The Touch World Cup will take place in Australia in April/May 2015. During the recent England tour of New Zealand I found myself with a morning off in Hamilton in the week leading up to the third Test. With little work to do before a conference in the afternoon, channel surfing was the order of the day.It is no surprise that in that part of the world, rugby gets a lot of airtime. But it was a bit of a head scratcher when it became apparent that competitive touch rugby was on the tube.That got the old cogs whirring. While a mixed team of Aussie men and women was efficiently seeing off their Kiwi counterparts, it was obvious that as brilliant as these players were, there was not one recognisable stars slipping passes and running cuts. What would happen if male and female Test stars played competitive mixed touch?In an age where we have international club sevens events and every big summer festival features men’s events, women’s events and every other activity you can think of – at the recent Sevens in the City bonanza at Allianz Park there were crossfit competitions, netball and for some reason a jumbo-screened FIFA 2014 competition, pitch-side – why not give a better funded/sponsored, star-heavy affair a whirl? Of course, in the purely hypothetical world of millionaire-backed Test Touch (*international touch is a big draw with a World Cup in April/May 2015, but this is a working title, for a heavily funded, competition involving big-name players) there is no way of knowing who would triumph.Clearly New Zealand would be favourites. The All Blacks are the world’s best team at the moment, the sevens sides for both genders are juggernauts and the Black Ferns are favourites for another women’s World Cup. For example, one of the Black Ferns’ big hitters Honey Hireme, Honey Bill to her chums, often plays mixed touch in the Hamilton area. Many of the ABs would play a scintillating game of touch judging by glimpses of their training – it wouldn’t really be a surprise if Conrad Smith turned out to be the best touch player on the planet. But would the Kiwi’s dominance transfer?See, the Wallabies’ lesser-known touch players had the better of their rivals in black (*and are current touch world champions at mixed touch) and just because their women’s team is not as regularly competitive as the Black Ferns at 15s does not mean they would wilt in touch. No contact, fewer numbers on the pitch, input from some of the more fleet-footed Test men could help to make a potent mix for Australia. Nipping in and out like Hokey Cokey grand masters could be just the game for the likes of Sharni Williams stepping off someone like Bernard Foley and hitting a slick Israel Folau. Hell, it could be the stuff of free-flowing (pipedream) brilliance.last_img read more

Analysis: Why New Zealand are masters of the offload

first_imgSo the first rule – offload in the wide channels – is qualified by another condition: Offload in the wide channels after turnover. Why the rules? New Zealand want to get the ball to the area of the field where the defence is both thinnest in numbers and where the defenders cannot be as physical as they would like.In both examples at 21:09 and 59:54, the All Blacks are moving the ball wide and forcing the Australian defensive line to chase them down either laterally or from behind. When the ball arrives at the first stopping point – the ruck at 21:18 or the drag-down tackle at 59:58 – there are only two Wallaby defenders in shot who can potentially influence the next attacking play.As soon as this favourable situation is established, it is the mental trigger for “offload”. So at 21:21 Ma’a Nonu offloads just before contact to create a mismatch in space – Dan Carter against Wallaby lock James Horwill. Carter duly steps around Horwill at 21:23 before passing to Dane Coles for the All Black hooker to gallop over from 40 metres out for the score. In the second example, Ben Smith offloads to Colin Slade who drops it off to Conrad Smith, and Australia are forced to give up a penalty for the early tackle on the Kiwi centre.Offloads in the midfield area between the two 15-metre lines are far less common, accounting for only 15-20% of total offloads. In this scenario the rule is: Offload from behind the defensive line, not in front of it… In both sequences the French attack is also attempting to use the offload to break the first line of defence, rather than to capitalise on a line break that has already been made beyond it. Another All Black theory has been effectively turned on its head.The technique on the offload is very different to that adopted by New Zealand. In all these examples, the French offloader is ‘standing tall’ and trying to push the ball away from him at chest level or above, he doesn’t get maximum extension. The ball is far closer to his body and he is attracting a lot of ‘flies’ or tacklers – two at 13:51 and 49:41, three in the Welsh choke tackle at 63:04. In these two instances, with New Zealand No 9 Aaron Smith breaking around the ruck at 43:57 and Nehe Milner-Skudder making the cut in midfield at 47:09, the offload is only an option once the break has been made, it is not used to engineer that break.A fourth rule can be called ‘maximum extension’ and is related to the offloading technique used by the All Blacks. At 43:59 (Aaron Smith), 47:14 (Milner-Skudder), 59:58 (Ben Smith) and 60:00 (Colin Slade), exactly the same technique is being employed. All the offloaders get maximum extension out in front to deliver a one-armed pass out of their natural hand. This movement takes the ball as far away from defenders as possible and gives the support player both a clearer view of the ball and more momentum on to it.If we take a look at France’s offloads against Wales, we find a completely different picture to that painted by the All Blacks. Only five out of 20 offloads are made in the two wide 15-metre corridors; 75% occur in midfield.In these examples, France are trying to offload where the defence is thickest and heavier physical contact is more likely. In the sequence from 44:52-44:59 there are never less than five Welsh defenders in shot and in the final two images at 44:58 and 44:59 the French attackers are outnumbered six to three. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Pass master: Sonny Bill Williams gets an offload away during RWC 2015. Photo: Getty Images Control of the pass is more difficult, there is more defensive interference and correspondingly little momentum on to the ball for the receiver. The pass at 13:51 goes forward, at 45:30 it is knocked on, at 63:04 the ball-carrier Jonathan Danty is held up and Wales win the turnover scrum.The translation of ‘offload’ can be completely different in one culture (New Zealand) compared to another (France). How the offload is implemented, the situations where it has been identified as a positive and the techniques used to make it work, are all important. With this in mind, it is perhaps no wonder Eddie Jones has cleverly chosen to minimise dependence on the offload with his new England side. The outlook and skills employed by the All Blacks take time to learn and refine, and to date no Six Nations team has either the technical ability or depth of understanding to imitate their achievements with it successfully.For the latest Rugby World subscription offers, click here. We compare the offloading skills of New Zealand and France to discover why the All Blacks are masters of the art The recent Six Nations has thrown up an urgent question about the value of offloading in the modern attacking game. In this year’s Six Nations, France did it a lot but received very little reward for their effort, while England did it less than anyone else but profited in attack nonetheless.What do the stats say? Let’s look at four important points of comparison:New Zealand have been the world’s top offloading team, and Stuart Lancaster’s England vintage and Guy Noves’s nouvelle France have in some measure tried to copy them. While Lancaster’s England achieved a healthy degree of success, scoring 32 tries in the 2014 and 2015 Six Nations tournaments combined, France have generated a meagre seven tries in this year’s competition at an underwhelming average of 1.4 tries per game.So why have New Zealand been so successful with the offload compared to France? The difference becomes apparent by comparing a couple of games where the offload tally has been relatively high. In their second Bledisloe Cup match last year, New Zealand offloaded 18 times on their way to a 41-13 victory over Australia, while France made 20 offloads in their 19-10 loss to Wales in the third round of the Six Nations.The All Blacks like to shift the ball wide on their own terms, mainly on turnover or kick return ball. To this end they tend to position their No 8 Kieran Read – the world’s top offloading forward – in the channel between the 15-metre and five-metre lines on either side of the field. This gives a vital clue about where and when they intend to offload the ball.Over 80% of New Zealand’s offloads occur in the wide channels, from the 15-metre line out towards touch. In the two sequences below, they are moving the ball wide after either a Richie McCaw breakdown turnover… Likewise after the two ground offloads at 75:24 and 75:26, the France attack finds itself at the same 2:1 numerical disadvantage. Lots of risk for very little potential reward! Or a lineout steal…last_img read more

The 2017 Lions squad have arrived in New Zealand

first_imgFOR THE LATEST SUBSCRIPTION OFFERS, CLICK HERESam Warburton provided a lighter note at the Lions’ first press conference on New Zealand soil. When asked about the traditional Maori welcome the Lions received at Auckland Airport, the captain quipped: “I have to be careful with the hongi because I’ve got a bigger nose than most people!”Greeting: Sam Warburton receives a hongi in welcome at Auckland Airport. Photo: Getty ImagesThe Lions responded with a rendition of Welsh hymn Calon Lan. They sang Scottish and Irish songs at Sunday’s farewell so perhaps there will be an English number during the welcome at Waitangi Treaty Grounds on Sunday. Choir practice is clearly paying off.Warburton also revealed that “New Zealand is my favourite place to play rugby outside Wales”. He should get his first opportunity on this tour against the NZ Provincial Barbarians. The team will be named at 7am NZ time tomorrow, 8pm in the UK today, with the 14 players who originally convened with the squad two and a half weeks ago expected to make up the bulk of the starting XV. Name game: Bryn Gatland in Super Rugby action for the Blues. Photo: Getty ImagesAs for the opposition, Warburton is well aware of one player – the boss’s son, Bryn Gatland. “I know their No 10 pretty well,” he said. “I’ve known Bryn for six or seven years, when he was first around the (Wales) squad. The Welsh lads know Bryn very well. He showed a lot of courage last year to kick the drop-goal to win (promotion for North Harbour). You have to give him credit for that, and he’s got a good bloodline as well.”More familiar foe will follow after the Barbarians opener, and debates will continue to rage, but once the first whistle goes on Saturday night the rugby should rightly take centre stage. What happened when the 2017 British & Irish Lions touched down in New Zealand LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALScenter_img Tough prep: Training numbers were limited for the Lions in the first two weeks. Photo: Getty Images Stephen Jones has written a column in the current issue of Rugby World bemoaning the fact that too often coaches dominate the build-up to games with tit-for-tat comments directed at each other.It’s an interesting read – pick up a copy if you haven’t already – and seems pertinent given that the British & Irish Lions arrived in New Zealand to find that Steve Hansen has said he would have rejected the tour schedule had it been presented to his All Blacks team.TO FIND OUT WHAT’S IN THE LATEST ISSUE OF RUGBY WORLD, CLICK HEREAll Blacks coach Hansen believes arriving on a Wednesday and playing on a Saturday is a farcical situation for the Lions to find themselves in, telling The Times: “You’d want to be there a week minimum. It’s nicer to be longer than that. When we tour we have full control over when we leave the country.”Hansen also suggested that the Lions should have sent the majority of their squad out to New Zealand at least a week earlier, with those involved in the Aviva Premiership and Guinness Pro12 finals to follow later. Had that been the arrangement, the Lions’ farewell dinner on Sunday night would have been sparsely attended!Sing song: The Lions respond to their Maori welcome with a Welsh hymn. Photo: Getty ImagesWhen Hansen’s comments were put to tour manager John Spencer, he responded by saying: “The schedule was set by the New Zealand Rugby Union – that’s a contractual thing and has been for many years. We don’t mind the schedule at all. The fact we’re playing the Super Rugby sides is exactly what the coaches want, to prepare sides for the Test. The thing we’re disappointed in on the domestic side is the preparation time. But that’s our lot, that’s what we have to react to.”The schedule has long come under scrutiny – Rugby World has criticised the lack of preparation time from the off – but there’s little point debating it now. We all know they should have had at least two more weeks together as an entire squad before flying out but it’s doubtful that a similar situation will be avoided for the 2021 trip to South Africa, such is the self-interest of all the parties involved and the unwillingness to compromise.last_img read more

Five things we learnt in rugby – September

first_imgA legendary Lion-bite, Sean O’Brien’s verbal volley, the Premiership’s American experiment and the Cheetahs proving a point, are all covered In power: It was a modest crowd in Philadelphia but you have to start somewhere to build US interestThe Saracens v Newcastle Falcons game was never about 16th September 2018, it was about 16th September 2028, where with enough graft, and a fair wind, the Premiership’s teams will be able to fill the 18,500 capacity Talen Energy Stadium and hopefully sign lucrative TV deals in the USA. A long-term plan to increase revenue streams via expansion certainly seems like a more prudent option than forcing players into an 11-month season. It is surely only a matter of time before Premiership Rugby not only demand that the entire Six Nations be played during the halftime breaks of Premiership fixtures, but extend the Gregorian calendar so that they can fit in more games – ‘Prember’, a month jammed in between September and October month, could be just around the corner.Scott Baldwin gets bitten by a LionAt first glance, one could be forgiven for thinking that Alun-Wyn Jones lost the plot in an Ospreys’ scrum and took a chunk out of Scott Baldwin’s rear. But it’s more surreal than that. During the Osprey’s visit to South Africa, where they played the Cheetahs, the squad visited a Lion enclosure. Having already stroked a Lioness, as did some of his teammates, with no adverse reaction from the animal, Baldwin moved onto the male and experienced something that few do – having a Lion hanging off their arm. Baldwin would be the first to admit that it was stupid. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Lion tamer: Scott Baldwin’s skirmish with a lion has gone down in rugby folklore center_img Can’t blame any outside half for wanting to leave WalesSeptember saw Dan Biggar confirm his move to Northampton. It’s a move that is as well renumerated as it is understandable. Being an outside half in Wales can be grim. It is arguably the most scrutinized occupation in Wales – way above the role of even Wales’ First Minister. Despite Dan Biggar’s largely positive recognition over the past three seasons, it hasn’t always been thus. You don’t need to delve too far back in the memory bank to recall Biggar being booed at an Osprey’s kit launch, by his own supporters. Being born in 1977, it is a situation that has affected every outside half that I have seen play for Wales. Only after their career are most Welsh outside halves appreciated.Pastures new: Dan Biggar is off to Northampton after a decade at the OspreysEven Stephen Jones and Neil Jenkins, who are now regarded as Welsh legends, were widely derided by the Welsh rugby public – ‘Wellies’ was the cruel name given to Stephen Jones who is by far the best Welsh outside half of the modern era and who is now creating a backline at the Scarlets that the Welsh team should aspire to. Rhys Priestland, who is currently excelling at Bath, was the most recent victim of the Welsh ‘goldfish bowl’. While we’re at it, the ‘goldfish bowl’ is a term that vastly underestimates the acidity with which the Welsh public can, on occasion, treat its players – a ‘septic tank full of Great White Sharks that can survive in liquid faeces’ is maybe a more accurate description. The lure and riches of the English Premiership will of course have ranked high on Biggar’s priority list, but leaving the shoals of apex predators swimming in poop will also have been a consideration.Sean O’Brien ‘speaking out’ validates supporter’s opinionsSean O’Brien’s criticism of Warren Gatland and Rob Howley certainly divided opinion. Half believing that what goes on tour stays on tour, the other supporting an employee’s right to criticise his boss. One benefit of players ‘speaking out’ is that it can validate long-held opinions of supporters. Often the ‘you haven’t played the game’ card is used as a stick to batter those who haven’t played test rugby when voicing an opinion. An ethos which at its extreme can lead to a closed shop of ex-professionals sometimes failing to publicly criticise those who are deserving of it.Outspoken: Sean O’Brien criticised the tactics of Warren Gatland and Rob HowleyThis is a situation that has certainly been felt in Wales with regards to the Welsh coaching setup. Long have supporters criticised ‘Warrenball’ only to be told that ‘Warrenball’ doesn’t exist at all and that it is a figment of their knowledge-less imaginations. However, when Sean O’Brien highlights over-training and a lack of direction from the Lions’ backs’ coach it does at least make supporters feel reassured that they do understand the game and a right to have an opinion. The more players that speak out, the better.The Cheetahs prove the doubters wrong The inclusion of the South African teams in the Pro 14 led to much hand wringing. The quality of those teams bringing further scowls and shaking of heads. However, the Cheetahs last two performances will certainly have put half of that debate to bed. The Cheetahs have won three on the bounce, a good run of form by any measure. But the fact that two of those victories came against Leinster and the Ospreys, who are both Celtic League/ Pro 12/ Pro 14 royalty, means that the Bloemfontein outfit are not merely in the league as a SARU moth ball measure, they are top six contenders.Point to prove: Torsten van Jaarsveld dots down for a second consecutive Cheetahs winThe Cheetahs have totalled 10 tries in their past two games and perhaps most impressively, reduced Leinster to a tackle completion of 74% – which is very low for a team of Leinster’s pedigree. It is also worth remembering that the Cheetahs have achieved this with a big chunk of their squad still committed to the Currie Cup, South Africa’s domestic competition. Whether the South African inclusion works long term remains to be seen, but the quality of the Cheetahs is no longer an issue.The USA experiment was a success, regardlessSaracens v Newcastle Falcons was largely derided in both the traditional media and social space. And whilst the game wasn’t a sell-out, nowhere near in fact, the experiment should be regarded as a success. A success of creative thinking that rugby needs more than ever. In a claustrophobic sporting market place where rugby is struggling to break-even, let alone make a profit (you need only look at Saracens’ P+L for evidence) rugby’s administrators need to take more risks, not less. Stroke the Lion it’ll be fine they said! Here’s @scottbaldwin2 petting a lion like it’s a pet cat! pic.twitter.com/Y95FObGeJ5— Andy Goode (@AndyGoode10) September 29, 2017But as true as that is, he has now taken his place at the top table of legendary Welsh off-field antics. A table where Andy Powell sits proudly. Not only has Baldwin guaranteed a post rugby career on the after-dinner circuit, he could spark a fantastic meme that could benefit charity. Much like the ‘ice-bucket challenge’, except in this instance Pro 14 players when touring South Africa have to do something dangerous to a deadly animal. Rob Evans, I nominate you to kick a hippo in the nuts. I jest of course.last_img read more

England wing Jonny May

first_imgThis article originally appeared in the September 2020 edition of Rugby World magazine.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. Downtime with… England wing Jonny MayWhat’s it like being back at Gloucester?It’s been really nice so far. It’s just nice being back playing rugby and having a bit of a routine. I did enjoy the isolation period but by the end of it I was ready to get back. I’m obviously happy to be back here and to be closer to my family, and I’m really enjoying training. We have a really good group.What did you enjoy about isolation?I fractured my cheek against Wales (in March) so I couldn’t play anyway and I quite enjoyed a break from rugby at that stage. It’s World Cup year, I’d had a sore foot then fractured my cheek, so I needed a break.I enjoy doing my own training anyway and I was able to have a good routine at home to get the body feeling good. I achieved that, got right physically and mentally, and now is a perfect time to come back and start rugby.And your wife worked out with you in lockdown… She’s a PT so she’s understanding and won’t eat cookies if I’m trying to eat clean. She’d come to the park to pass the ball with me. We want to eat well and train together – it was good. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS As he returns to Gloucester, he talks fitness, films and funny moments Fast show: Jonny May breaks against Ireland during the Six Nations (Getty Images) My wife, Sophie. We’ve just done isolation together so we can do a lift.What’s the funniest thing you’ve seen on the pitch? When we played the third Test against South Africa in Cape Town (in 2018), it pissed it down. The Zulu performers ran out onto the pitch one after the other – one stacked it, the next one stacked it…At the time you’re noticing it but you’re focused; you’re in the moment and ready to play. On reflection when I was back in England – and my mum had kept it on Sky Planner – seeing them go arse over tit three times in a row… Eddie Jones said it was a good omen for us.If you could have one superpower, what would it be? Time travel. Just to have the control to rewind or fast-forward, to do what you want.What would you save if your house was on fire? Sophie is safe. I don’t really love possessions, so I don’t know what I’d grab. I wouldn’t risk my health for any object.Any nicknames? Just Jonny.Your three dream dinner party guests… I’d always like to get politicians to find out the answers to stuff. Off the top of my head, Boris Johnson, President Trump and Barack Obama. With those last two hopefully you’d get a lot of information. I’d love to know what I don’t know – and there are a lot of things we don’t know.Although, if they’re just coming to a dinner party, you don’t know that they’ll tell you things, so it’s probably a terrible answer and I’d have been better off going with people I could have fun with.Friends reunited: Gloucester’s Jonny May is tackled by his former club Leicester (Getty Images)Your Mastermind specialist subject? I’m shocking at quizzes. I’d probably go for something like animated films or Disney films. Hercules is my favourite.And guilty pleasure?It has to be food of some sort – biscuits or fizzy drinks.Any hidden talents? I can play the drums but I don’t have a drum set any more. I had an electric drum set that I brought into the club and left in the team room (during his previous spell at Gloucester). We were talking about it today in the gym and I asked if it was still there. It’s not, so somebody has obviously taken it whilst I’ve been away.What would you like to achieve outside of rugby? Just happiness. What are your phobias? I don’t really like heights, so I’m not interested in bungee-jumping or parachuting. I used to not like flying but I’ve got used to it as I’ve done it a fair bit now. Nobody likes turbulence but I used to freak out.Have you any superstitions? I believe in alternative therapies – acupuncture, reiki… There are a lot of things we don’t understand but I do believe in alternative medicine and energy systems.What’s your most embarrassing moment? I don’t tend to get embarrassed. Sometimes I like being the joke and I’m happy to laugh at myself. I remember even when I got my shorts pulled down when playing for the U20s, I saw the funny side of it.Is it the same with the footage of you packing down in the scrum… I guess that was a little embarrassing but it’s not scarred me.What annoys you? I hate people who litter. If someone leaves a cigarette or crisp packet, I tell them off. I really hate animal cruelty too – that makes my blood boil. I’ve done things for the Dogs Trust and other charities.Who would you like to be stuck in a lift with? last_img read more

Who Are The BBC’s Six Nations Pundits?

first_img Who Are The BBC’s Six Nations Pundits?All the matches from the 2021 Six Nations will be televised on either BBC or ITV channels depending on the team playing at home. Wales, Scotland and France home games will be televised on BBC whereas England, Ireland and Italy home matches will be shown on ITV.The BBC has recently announced their line-up of pundits who will present, commentate and give their opinions on the action on the pitch.But who exactly are these pundits? Below we take a look.Related: 2021 Six Nations coverageWho Are The BBC’s Six Nations Pundits?TelevisionFormer France and Leicester Tigers hooker Benjamin Kayser joins the BBC team for the 2021 Six Nations while two-time British & Irish Lions captain Sam Warburton returns to the BBC’s line-up after a coaching role with Wales last year.Water boy: Sam Warburton assisting Wales at last year’s Six NationsGabby Logan and John Inverdale front BBC Sport’s TV coverage and they will be joined by some of the biggest names in rugby union. Can’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS As well as Kayser and Warburton, this year’s studio team includes Martin Johnson, Jamie Heaslip, John Barclay, Jeremy Guscott, Jonathan Davies, Chris Paterson, Thomas Castaignede, Andy Nicol and Brian Moore.TV commentary will be provided by Eddie Butler, Andrew Cotter and Sara Orchard while Sonja McLaughlan and Lee McKenzie will be pitch-side.Radio Every home nations’ men’s game will be broadcast live on BBC Radio 5 Live or 5 Live Sports Extra throughout the competition.Sonja McLaughlan and Mark Chapman will present the coverage for BBC Radio 5 Live, joined by Chris Jones and Sara Orchard, alongside pundits Matt Dawson, Paul Grayson, Andy Nicol, Benjamin Kayser, James Hook, Natasha Hunt, Tommy Bowe and Jamie Heaslip.The Women’s Six Nations Championship will return in April with broadcasting deals yet to be announced. Who will be providing punditry as part of the BBC’s coverage of the 2021 Six Nations? Let’s take a look New kid on the block: Benjamin Kayser won 37 caps for France (Getty Images) Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.last_img read more

Comienzan labores de limpieza en Misisipi después de huracán Isaac

first_img Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Belleville, IL Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Hopkinsville, KY Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Obreros del servicio eléctrico reparan los daños dejados por el huracán Isaac a lo largo de una carretera en Waveland, Misisipi, el 31 de agosto de 2012. Foto de REUTERS/Michael Spooneybarger[Diócesis de Misisipi, Gautier] Clérigos episcopales a lo largo de la costa de Misisipi convienen en que la devastación causada por el huracán Isaac podría haber sido mucho peor.Desde Pascagoula a Bay St. Louis, a lo largo de una faja de 80  kilómetros de largo, las seis iglesias costeras de Misisipi  recibieron pocos daños del huracán de categoría 1 que inundó de lluvia la costa del Golfo entre el 28 y el 30 de agosto.“Nos sentimos muy felices de informar que todas nuestras iglesias quedaron intactas al paso del huracán Isaac”, dijo el obispo de la Diócesis de Misisipi, Duncan Gray, III.San Pedro del Mar [St. Peter’s by-the-Sea] en Gulfport experimentó los peores problemas cuando el agua penetró en el salón parroquial el 30 de agosto en medio del embate de la lluvia.Una excavadora descarga escombros de la tormenta en un camión de volquete en la carretera 90 cerca de la entrada de la base Keesler de la Fuerza Aérea en Biloxi. Las labores de limpieza andan a toda marcha hoy en la costa de Misisipi. Foto de Scott Lenoir“Contamos con unos 40 voluntarios con aspiradoras de líquido que vinieron y sacaron de 5 a 7 centímetros de agua”, dijo el Rdo. Scott Williams, diácono de San Pedro, que coordinó al equipo de trabajo.Aunque la costa de Misisipi no experimentó los mismos daños e inundaciones que algunas partes de Luisiana, centenares de residentes aún se encontraban desplazados en albergues debido a interrupciones en el fluido eléctrico, los intensos vientos y las lluvias torrenciales que dieron lugar a inundaciones en viviendas y empresas situadas en zonas bajas cerca de las playas y a lo largo de varios ríos.El nivel de precipitaciones en la costa varió de 25 a 43 centímetros.Antes de la tormenta, la Rda. Carol  Spencer, presidenta del equipo de trabajo diocesano para enfrentar desastres naturales, avisó a todas las congregaciones que “esperaran lo mejor y se prepararan para lo peor”.“Nuestro equipo de trabajo se mantuvo en comunicación con cada uno”, dijo Spencer, diácona de la catedral episcopal de San Andrés [St. Andrew’s Episcopal Cathedral] en Jackson, Misisipi. “Fuimos afortunados de contar con dos miembros del equipo de trabajo presentes en la costa que pudieron reportar de primera mano lo que sucedió”.Spencer calcula que entre la oficina diocesana y los miembros del equipo de trabajo, al menos se hicieron tres llamadas a cada una de las congregaciones de la costa del Golfo antes y durante la tormenta.La Rda. Cathy Halford, diácona episcopal y coordinadora de cuidado pastoral para el equipo de trabajo, se asoció con Beneficencias Católicas [Catholic Charities] de Jackson para responder a peticiones de suministros de personas que estaban pasando la tormenta en el Coliseo de Misisipi [Mississippi Coliseum] en Jackson.Ayuda y Desarrollo Episcopales Episcopal ha estado en disposición de prestar asistencia mientras los equipos diocesanos puedan evaluar la situación.“En cada paso del camino, Ayuda y Desarrollo Episcopales se mantuvo al tanto de nuestro trabajo y de las necesidades que teníamos”, dijo Spencer. “También apreciamos las muchas llamadas que recibimos de diócesis de toda la nación que estaban al tanto de nosotros. Seguiremos supervisando las necesidades de las iglesias y de su gente mientras se llevan a cabo las valoraciones y se expresan las necesidades”.Entre tanto, en una conferencia de prensa televisada para toda la nación el 1 de septiembre, Janet Napolitano, la Secretaria de Seguridad Nacional, le garantizó a los residentes de la costa de Misisipi que la Agencia Federal de Control de Emergencias  llevaría a cabo campañas de limpieza y de ayuda.A la conferencia de prensa, que tuvo lugar en el cuartel de bomberos No. 1 de Bay St. Louis, asistió el alcalde Les Fillingame. “Nuestra mayor información parte del acontecer de esta tormenta y de los daños que no tenemos”, dijo Fillingame.– El Rdo. Scott Lenoir, director de The Mississippi Episcopalian y miembro del equipo de trabajo para enfrentar desastres naturales, se encuentra en la costa de Misisipi para informar de primera mano acerca de los estragos ocasionados por Isaac.Traducción de Vicente Echerri. Rector Knoxville, TN This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Martinsville, VA Comienzan labores de limpieza en Misisipi después de huracán Isaac Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Submit a Job Listing Rector Bath, NC Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Featured Events Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Associate Rector Columbus, GA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Collierville, TN Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Smithfield, NC center_img Youth Minister Lorton, VA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Submit an Event Listing Press Release Service Rector Albany, NY Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Director of Music Morristown, NJ Featured Jobs & Calls Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Washington, DC Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Tampa, FL Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Submit a Press Release New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Pittsburgh, PA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Por Scott LenoirPosted Sep 6, 2012 last_img read more

Churches coordinate relief efforts in South Sudan’s protracted conflict

first_img Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Collierville, TN Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Tags Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Submit an Event Listing TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Albany, NY Advocacy Peace & Justice, Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Submit a Press Release Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Press Release Service New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Submit a Job Listing Rector Belleville, IL This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Featured Events Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Smithfield, NC Featured Jobs & Calls Anglican Communion, Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Bath, NC Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Washington, DC Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Pittsburgh, PA By Matthew DaviesPosted May 15, 2015 Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Sudan & South Sudan Rector Tampa, FL Churches coordinate relief efforts in South Sudan’s protracted conflict An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Associate Rector Columbus, GA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Youth Minister Lorton, VA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Director of Music Morristown, NJ Food supplies distributed by SUDRA include maize, beans, cooking oil, salt and other essentials. Photo: SUDRA[Episcopal News Service] As the violent conflict in South Sudan continues into its 17th month, the Episcopal Church in the war-ravaged country and its global partners remain steadfast in their commitment to providing immediate relief to the hundreds of thousands of internally displaced people and to the ultimate goal of peace and reconciliation.“Amid conflict and tribulation, God cannot forget his people regardless of their disobedience,” the Rev. Joseph El-hag Abe Natana, general manager of the Sudanese Development and Relief Agency (SUDRA), told Episcopal News Service as the United Nations reported that more than 300,000 people are without “life-saving” aid in Unity State, along the border between Sudan and South Sudan, after heavy fighting has forced international aid agencies to withdraw.“God always raises expectations with a message of hope that he will deliver his people. Hence, the humanitarian response, prayers and lobbying by many nations and people for peace, both regionally and internationally, is seen as God’s care, support and intervention,” said Natana, a priest of the Episcopal Church of South Sudan and Sudan.South Sudan became the world’s newest nation in July 2011, when it seceded from the north in a referendum on independence following almost half a century of civil war.But a separate conflict erupted in December 2013 after South Sudan President Salva Kiir accused his former deputy Riek Machar of plotting a coup.While the conflict began from a political dispute within the ruling party, it quickly morphed into tribal warfare between the Dinka, allied primarily with Kiir, and the Nuer with Machar, now a rebel leader.Despite several attempts at brokering peace between the two leaders, fighting has continued, and more than 1.5 million people remain internally displaced and in desperate need of humanitarian aid.SUDRA helps to coordinate food rations for the internally displaced. Photo: SUDRAIn response to the current crisis, Anglican agencies and affiliated groups are supporting SUDRA, the relief and development arm of the Episcopal Church of South Sudan & Sudan, in providing emergency food to help internally displaced people throughout the south, particularly vulnerable children, women and the elderly. Food supplies include maize, beans, cooking oil, salt and other essentials.The Anglican Alliance – which connects and strengthens the development, relief and advocacy activities of churches, agencies and networks of the Anglican Communion – recognizes SUDRA as the lead agency and primary partner for the church’s coordinated response to the conflict in South Sudan.Episcopal Relief & Development is one of SUDRA’s long-standing partners, and continues to support its work in addressing the growing humanitarian crisis in South Sudan, especially in reviewing emergency assessments, planning program activities, preparing reports as well as conducting audits and evaluations.Nagulan Nesiah, senior program officer for disaster response and risk reduction for Episcopal Relief & Development, said that the Anglican Alliance’s efforts in mobilizing all Anglican partners to support a coordinated process “has improved disaster response efforts by providing a way to consolidate funds donated by various partners to support a comprehensive strategy.”Episcopal Relief & Development continues to work with SUDRA on strengthening disaster risk preparedness and response. It was among 12 Anglican agencies that together developed the “Pastors and Disasters” toolkit, a resource designed to improve disaster response efforts within the Anglican relief and development community.“The situation in South Sudan continues to intensify,” said Nesiah. “Episcopal Relief & Development is grateful for the partnership with SUDRA and the Anglican Alliance as it continues to support the church’s ministry to care for underserved communities and people impacted by the ongoing crisis.”Natana identified SUDRA’s priorities as providing emergency relief food, prayer and counseling, peace building and rehabilitation, and psychosocial support programs to the tens of thousands of internally displaced people. “These people are destitute and vulnerable, they need humanitarian assistance,” especially the children, women and the elderly, he said.He praised the support and coordinating work of the Anglican Alliance that “has enabled SUDRA to be more effective in providing relief and support to internally displaced people throughout South Sudan.“Global partnership is paramount because the crisis has not ended,” he said. “More fighting and displacement continues that demands relief delivery, peace building, lobbying and advocacy for a peaceful South Sudan.”The U.S.-based Episcopal Church has long-standing partnerships with the Episcopal Church of South Sudan and Sudan, through companion diocese relationships, Episcopal Relief & Development programs, the advocacy work of the Office of Government Relations, and the support and solidarity of the Office of Global Relations.Current companion relationships include Albany (New York) with the Province of Sudan; Bethlehem (Pennsylvania) with Kajo Keji; Chicago with Renk; Indianapolis with Bor; Missouri with Lui; Rhode Island with Ezo; Southwestern Virginia with the Province of Sudan; and Virginia with the Province of Sudan.Partnerships also exist through various networks such as the American Friends of the Episcopal Church of Sudan and Hope With South Sudan.“As brothers and sisters in the body of Christ, we remain committed to supporting the people of the Episcopal Church of South Sudan and Sudan as they work to deliver relief to the suffering South Sudanese, while at the same time working for peace with justice,” said the Rev. Ranjit K. Mathews, officer for global relations and networking for the Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society. “There are a number of strong diocesan relationships between The Episcopal Church and the ECSSS and they will continue to be a place where information is shared, and more importantly where prayer and solidarity is offered.”AFRECS is providing emergency relief to several Sudanese bishops whose displacement from their dioceses has resulted in their relocation, both within South Sudan and to neighboring countries, “leaving them with virtually no resources with which to support themselves and their families or to extend pastoral care to their dispersed congregations and clergy,” Richard Parkins, executive director of AFRECS, told ENS.While the security situation in Juba, the nation’s capital, is relatively stable, border regions such as the oil-rich Upper Nile and Kadugli are heavily impacted by conflict, as well as the destabilizing efforts of the Khartoum government in the north.AFRECS has been helping to fund the work of Bishop Andudu Elnail as he recruits and trains pastors in the Diocese of Kadugli “where the people of the Nuba Mountains continue to live in fear because of Khartoum’s ongoing assault on the Nuba people,” Parkins said.A pilot project of peace building in Bor (Upper Nile), a region that has experienced some of the most painful suffering resulting from intertribal conflict, will begin in late May. The project is a collaboration between the Anglican Alliance, U.K. and U.S. church partners and the Justice, Peace and Reconciliation Commission of the Episcopal Church of South Sudan and Sudan.AFRECS, along with other U.S. partners, also is helping to support peace and reconciliation initiatives in the Kakuma Refugee Camp in Kenya, home to thousands of refugees who have the same tribal identities of those who fight each other in South Sudan, Parkins explained. “These efforts are designed to test the means of bringing warring factions together with the hope that reconciliation formed in the camp will provide a model for what might be accomplished in South Sudan when peace initiatives can be realistically carried out,” he said.The South Sudan Council of Churches, an ecumenical movement that brings together the country’s various Christian denominations, has pressed for a place at the negotiating table but found its pleas for a ceasefire and an end to the suffering largely ignored, Parkins explained. Meanwhile, AFRECS and other partners in the United States and the United Kingdom “continue to encourage peacemaking efforts as a means of bringing hope to a war-weary nation where thousands are suffering and held hostage to the intransigence of the government leaders and their rebel adversaries.”One consequence of a decades-long civil war between the north and south followed by an internal conflict fueled by political differences “has been the emergence of a culture of violence that is not tied to the tribal/ethnic war that has occupied so many parts of South Sudan, but which results in violent expressions of revenge and retaliation among other tribes and subtribes,” he added. “This proliferation of violence could seriously frustrate future peacemaking efforts. This situation also makes the end of fighting all the more urgent.”— Matthew Davies is an editor/reporter for the Episcopal News Service. Curate Diocese of Nebraskalast_img read more

Church of England joins worldwide prayer for care of creation

first_img Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET August 31, 2015 at 1:04 pm Mr. McLane, I’d agree that prayer is effective, whether before or after one’s threshold of scientific support has been achieved. Would you say that the case supporting human influence on global warming and climate change is at a level of scientific rigor similar to those supporting the flat earth and Ptolemaic cosmology theories? I think the evidence for human contribution to global warming and climate change is considerably stronger. In any case, while you wait for proof, I hope you’ll join me in prayer. Comments (3) TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Belleville, IL Environment & Climate Change Posted Aug 28, 2015 Press Release Service Rector Smithfield, NC Anglican Communion, Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI August 28, 2015 at 11:43 pm You are kidding of course. An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Albany, NY Michael McLane says: Rector Hopkinsville, KY August 28, 2015 at 4:53 pm How presumptuous to believe that man is causing climate change through our “profligate use of fossil fuels”. There is no proof that man CAN affect climate change, for bad or good. The writer says “A consensus has emerged about the need to move to a low carbon economy.” Remember, there was a consensus, many years ago, that the earth was flat and also the sun was not the center of our solar system, rather it revolved around the earth. Ultimately these theories, when tested by the scientific method, were proven false. I are still waiting for experiments and results to prove or disprove that “man is causing global warming” . Until then, prayer is probably the most effective activity. Rector Bath, NC Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Featured Jobs & Calls Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Knoxville, TN This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Curate Diocese of Nebraska In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Comments are closed. Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Submit a Press Release Rector Washington, DC Submit a Job Listing William Hensel says: Rector Pittsburgh, PA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Advocacy Peace & Justice, Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Shreveport, LA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Director of Music Morristown, NJ Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Tags Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Church of England joins worldwide prayer for care of creation [Church of England] The Church of England’s lead Bishop for the environment, the Rt Revd Nicholas Holtam is calling on congregations to join Pope Francis, Patriarch Bartholomew, members of the global Anglican Church and Christians around the world to fast and pray for the care of creation on 1st September.Bishop Nicholas said:“It will do us all good to stop, fast, think and pray about the need to care for God’s good but fragile creation. We live at a time when human activity has caused a dramatic reduction in the earth’s biodiversity and when people are causing climate change through our profligate use of fossil fuels. A consensus has emerged about the need to move to a low carbon economy.“Whatever the scientific, economic and political difficulties at root this is a spiritual problem. Prayer helps clarify what we want and strengthens our determination for God’s will to be done on earth as it is in heaven. On 1st September, join the prayer for the care of creation.”The latest commitment by the CofE to transition to a low carbon future seeks to join with other denominations including the Orthodox Church, which has celebrated a Day of Prayer for the Environment on 1 September since 1989; and with the Roman Catholic Church. Pope Francis established a ‘World Day of Prayer for the Care of Creation’ for the [Roman] Catholic Church which will be held annually on the same date.Other members of the Anglican Church across the world have pledged their support for praying on the 1st September for climate justice, including the Archbishop of Cape Town and Primate of the Anglican Church of Southern Africa, the Most Revd Dr Thabo Makgoba. Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Martinsville, VA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Youth Minister Lorton, VA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Featured Events Associate Rector Columbus, GA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Tampa, FL Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Submit an Event Listing Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Collierville, TN Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Larry Hartman says: Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MIlast_img read more